The right to videotape a cop


Yesterday, I was quoted in a story in the Boston Herald about a new lawsuit brought by my colleague Harold Friedman against the Boston Police Department. Harold's client, Maury Palino, alleges that he was hit and pepper sprayed in retaliation for filming some policemen making a violent arrest. In the article, I argue that the right to film police officers is essential to promoting an open and more free society, a right, incidentally, recognized by the courts in Simon Glik's recent case.

You can find the article by clicking here.

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TFD Excerpt in the Boston Herald: Hub Author Tells of Bribes, Perjury, Feds Gone Haywire


Featured in the Sunday, October 18 edition of the Boston Herald is the story of former Boston Mayor Kevin White and his political ally Theodore Anzalone, a segment from the first chapter of Three Felonies a Day. The excerpt chronicles federal prosecutors’ crusade to unseat Mayor White in the early 1980s. The prosecutorial techniques used – pressuring lower-level administration officials to “flip” against their superiors and to provide testimony that (no surprise!) turned out to be false, along with “creative” use of a criminal statute to encompass conduct not clearly covered by it – offer a glimpse at the pernicious developments described in Three Felonies a Day. And the saga sheds new light on current Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s title as longest-serving mayor in Boston history.

Read on to view a PDF of the print edition in your browser.

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Updates related to Harvey's
book Three Felonies a Day, a critical
take on the Justice Department

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