BC and the Belfast Project: A Scholar's Privilege to Disobey

The ongoing imbroglio over Boston College’s Belfast Oral History Project has been disappointing at almost every turn. The case involves a subpoena by the Northern Irish police force of confidential materials collected by Ed Moloney and Anthony McIntyre, two scholars who worked with BC to create an oral history of the Irish “Troubles” as told by former IRA and Loyalist members closest to the fighting. In my latest piece for my Forbes.com blog, “Injustice Department,” I discuss the grave implications for First Amendment rights resulting from the blithe willingness of Boston’s federal courts to jeopardize scholarly research in the name of dubious law enforcement claims. Furthermore, the article raises the important question of what could have been done differently to allow the scholars, like reporters whose confidential notes are being subpoenaed, to resist the disclosure of their sources through civil disobedience.

You can find the article after the jump.
Comments (0)

Rutgers Conviction Goes Too Far

The New Jersey Star Ledger has a piece out today in which Paul Mulshine discusses the recent conviction of Dharun Ravi. Ravi shared a Rutgers dorm room with Tyler Clementi, a gay student who later committed suicide, and faced charges stemming from his setting up a camera to spy on Clementi. In comments I made for the article, I suggest that while Clementi's privacy rights were clearly violated by Ravi's camera setup, the New Jersey legislature's attempt to create new hate crime and anti-harassment laws in response to the Rutgers case is an overreaction that violates the principle of equal application of the law. This case should have been a matter of a fundamental violation of privacy rights. Instead, the New Jersey legislature and Rutgers administrators are fighting an ideological battle to make political correctness the law of the land.
Comments (0)

WSJ: Yes Means Yes—Except on Campus


As those who read my first book, The Shadow University: The Betrayal of Liberty on America’s Campuses, already know, despite their reputation as places of free inquiry, personal liberty, and supportive community, college campuses have become increasingly repressive and bureaucratic institutions. Nowhere has this trend been more evident of late than in the realm of sexual assault and harassment, where unprecedented government intervention into the personal lives of students has produced alarming and irrational results.

Comments (0)

The
Silverg
Latest

The hub of recent happenings
in Harvey's professional life
  SUB-BLOGS:



professional resume引越し

Archive by Years